Fīat Jūstitia

 

Julian Assange

Julian Assange (3 July 1971) is an Australian editor, publisher, and activist who founded WikiLeaks in 2006. In 2010 WikiLeaks published a series of leaks provided by U.S. Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning.

US Department of Justice forced Assange to claim asylum in the Ecuador embassy (London) June 2012. He remained confined to a corner of the embassy for 7 years but on 11-April-2019 a new Ecuadorean government withdrew asylum and UK police entered the embassy to arrest him.

Since arrest the US has sought Assange’s extradition to America but to date the UK court has refused the extradition order, citing likelihood Assange would face torture and/or at risk of dying in the US special criminal penitentiary. Assange is being held at Belmarsh high-security prison, solitary confinement and other cruel and unusual treatment.

Leaks included the Baghdad airstrike Collateral Murder video (April 2010), the Afghanistan war logs (July 2010), the Iraq war logs (October 2010), and Cablegate (November 2010).

 

Daniel Ellsberg

Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is an American economist, political activist, and former United States military analyst. While employed by the RAND Corporation, Ellsberg precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of the U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times, The Washington Post and other newspapers.

On January 3, 1973, Ellsberg was charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 along with other charges of theft and conspiracy, carrying a total maximum sentence of 115 years. Because of governmental misconduct and illegal evidence-gathering, and the defense by Leonard Boudin and Harvard Law School professor Charles Nesson, Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr. dismissed all charges against Ellsberg on May 11, 1973.

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Casualties

 

Fred Hampton

Fred Hampton (August 30, 1948–December 4, 1969) was an inspirational activist for the NAACP and the Black Panther Party. At age 21, Hampton was fatally shot alongside a fellow activist (FBI asset) during a bogus law enforcement raid.

Hampton began by persuading Chicago’s Black and Puerto Rican street gangs to call a truce. He worked with white-dominated groups like Students for a Democratic Society and the Weather Underground, creating what he called a class-conscious “Rainbow Coalition”. The crossover vision, like Martin Luther King, made Hampton a ‘threat’ and he was targeted for assassination by the FBI.

On December 3, 1969, FBI asset William O’Neal secretly drugged Hampton and, shortly afterward, law enforcement agents raided Hampton’s apartment. There was no warrant. The agents entered Hampton’s apartment with guns firing, mortally wounding the sleeping Hampton, his fiancee and a bodyguard.

When an officer realised Hampton hadn’t been killed, he executed the activist – two shots point-blank to the head. Hampton’s fiancee, who was pregnant, survived the wounds.

The FBI’s Pennsylvania field office was broken into not long after the assassination and, among the files found, was a floor-plan of Hampton’s apartment and documents relating to the assassination plan and covering up their role in the murder.

“Nothing is more important than stopping Fascism. Because if we don’t, Fascism is gonna stop us all.” – Fred Hampton

Robert F Kennedy

Robert F Kennedy (20th November 1925-6th June 1968) was the 42-year-old younger brother of assassinated President John F. Kennedy. He served as Attorney General 1961–1964 and was elected to the Senate (D-NY) in 1964. At the time of his assassination, Sen. Kennedy had just won the 1968 Democratic presidential primary in California and was widely regarded as the candidate most likely to be elected President.

Kennedy was shot dead in a crowded kitchen passageway, after making a victory speech in California, ostensibly by Sirhan Sirhan, a 24-year-old Palestinian who opened fire with a .22-calibre revolver, hitting RFK three times, and wounding five other people were wounded.

Kennedy was taken to hospital and despite surgery, was pronounced dead at 1:44 a.m. (PDT) on June 6, nearly 26 hours after the shooting.

 

 

Present Whistleblowers

 

#FreeDonziger

Steven Donziger (born 1961) is an American attorney known for winning a record $9 billion judgment against Chevron,over the Lago Agrio oil field environmental destruction and toxic health damage. Donziger represented over 30,000 farmers and indigenous people from Ecuador. Chevron has dodged payment and manipulated corrupt New York courts (including judicial appointment) to place Donziger under perpetual house arrest since 2019.

Donziger is a litmus case for corporations leveraging their vast resources to evade paying legal settlements, pervert justice and imprison individuals (including lawyers representing their victims).

 

#Wikileaks

Chelsea Manning (born 17-Dec-1987 as Bradley Manning) is an American activist and whistleblower. She is a former US Army soldier, convicted by court-martial in July 2013 of violations of the Espionage Act and other offenses, after disclosing to Julian Assange at WikiLeaks nearly 750,000 classified or sensitive military and diplomatic documents. Material included videos of 2007, Baghdad airstrike and 2009 Granai airstrike in Afghanistan; 251,287 U.S. diplomatic cables; and 482,832 Army reports a.k.a. “Iraq War Logs” and “Afghan War Diary”.

Manning suffered torture and solitary confinement by the US government between 2010 and 2017, plus a year extra imprisoned for refusing to testify against Julian Assange in 2019-2020. Barack Obama commuted her sentence in 2017 to time served.

 

#NSAsurveillance

Edward Snowden (21-Jun-1983) is an American former computer intelligence consultant who leaked information classified by the N.S.A. in 2013 when he was an employee and subcontractor for the Central Intelligence Agency. He uncovered widespread proof of constitutionally illegal abuses of state surveillance and evidence of Patriot Act / Espionage Act violations used to spy indiscriminately on the American public.

Snowden fled the United States May 2013, to Hong Kong and then Moscow, where the Russians granted him political asylum. Snowden published the NSA files through journalist Glenn Greenwald and four major newspapers (New York Times, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Le Monde and Washington Post).

 

 

Present Whistleblowers

 

#StandWithDanielHale

Daniel Hale is a veteran of the US Air Force. During his military service from 2009 to 2013, he took part in the US drone program, working with both the NSA and the Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan. After leaving the Air Force, Hale became an outspoken opponent of the US targeted killings program. Hale based his criticisms on his own participation in the drone program, which included helping to select targets based on faulty criteria and attacks on unarmed innocent civilians.

In May 2019, Daniel Hale was arrested and indicted on allegations that he disclosed classified documents about the U.S. military’s assassination program, believed to have been the source material for a series in The Intercept called “The Drone Papers”. On March 31, 2021, Hale pleaded guilty to a single count under the Espionage Act, carrying a maximum sentence of 10 years. On July 27, 2021, Daniel was sentenced to 45 months, and he’s currently incarcerated in maximum security federal prison.

 

 

Fiat Justitia Advocates

 

#DennisKucinich

Dennis Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician. A U.S. Representative from Ohio from 1997 to 2013. He ran for governor of Ohio in the 2018 election, losing in the primary to establishment neoliberal candidate Richard Cordray.

From 1977 to 1979, Kucinich served as mayor of Cleveland, an ideologically embattled term in which he survived a corporate-funded smear campaign and recall election while successfully bringing to heel the corrupt municipal electric utility, ending the company’s holding Cleveland to ransom to profit squeeze its public-service monopoly.

Kucinich‘s congressional district was redistricted out of existence in 2013. In December 2020, he filed paperwork to run in the 2021 Cleveland mayoral election.

 

 

Past Whistleblowers

#EspionageAct1917

Anthony Russo (October 14, 1936–August 6, 2008) was an American researcher who assisted Daniel Ellsberg, his friend and former colleague at the RAND Corporation, in copying the Pentagon Papers. 

Anthony Russo was one of only four Americans charged under the Espionage Act 1917. Russo (with Daniel Ellsberg) was charged with espionage, theft, and conspiracy. On May 11, 1973, a federal court judge dismissed all charges against them. Judge William M. Byrne Jr. dismissed the case in May 1973 before it reached a jury, after the office of Ellsberg’s psychiatrist had been burglarized and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had lost records of what may have been illegally taped telephone conversations. Byrne was also offered the position of FBI director by John Ehrlichman during the trial.

 

#EspionageAct1917

Thomas Andrews Drake (born 1957) is a former senior executive of the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), a decorated United States Air Force and United States Navy veteran, and a whistleblower. In 2010, the government alleged that Drake mishandled documents, one of the few such Espionage Act cases in U.S. history. Drake’s defenders claim that he was instead being persecuted for challenging the Trailblazer Project..

On June 9, 2011, all 10 original charges against him were dropped. Drake rejected several deals because he refused to “plea bargain with the truth”. He eventually pleaded to one misdemeanor count for exceeding authorized use of a computer; Jesselyn Radack of the Government Accountability Project, who helped represent him, called it an act of “civil disobedience.”

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#PentagonPaper

 

Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is an American economist, political activist, and former United States military analyst. While employed by the RAND Corporation, Ellsberg precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of the U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times, The Washington Post and other newspapers.

On January 3, 1973, Ellsberg was charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 along with other charges of theft and conspiracy, carrying a total maximum sentence of 115 years. Because of governmental misconduct and illegal evidence-gathering, and the defense by Leonard Boudin and Harvard Law School professor Charles Nesson, Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr. dismissed all charges against Ellsberg on May 11, 1973.